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  2. Fax number for Disputes

    Hi James, sorry it took me so long to get back to you. I do not know of one, but you can use the dispute form online.
  3. Fax number for Disputes

    Is there an email for disputes you know of ?
  4. Fax number for Disputes

    This is the only one I know of 972-390-4908. Can't say for certain what department its in.
  5. Fax number for Disputes

    Ive been told that experian does not accept disputes via fax which i know is not true because ive disputed and has been succesful in disputing via fax to experian. That number has now been changed. Does anyone knows of the fax numbers or preferably the email address to the fraud dept to where i can send my disputes. Thank you in advance.
  6. Wrong balance for a tax lien paid off

    Hi Dean, Have you contacted Experian to correct the amount yet? Like you said, it seems fairly obvious, so you should have no problem disputing the incorrect information. They will have 30 days to review your dispute and get back to you. Getting the lien deleted from your credit report is another issue, however. Once the lien has been released it is supposed to drop off your credit report 7 years from the day it was filed. However, there are regulatory changes coming in July that will probably remove from your credit report anyway. If it were me and I had all of my paperwork handy, I'd probably initiate the dispute process just to be safe. During that process, you might as well ask for it to removed from you credit report early since it's likely fall off in July anyway. It can't hurt. Let me know how it goes.
  7. Hello, this is Dean, Back in 2014 i paid off my CA State tax lien. Experian is reporting as released in the amount of $21,727.0, when the actual amount was 2,172.0. Obviously, this is a typo error. I need this changed or deleted as soon as possible, as I am buying a vehicle in the next month or so. What is the best process to make this happen in that time frame? Appreciate any feedback, thanks. Dean
  8. Hi MinMac, This page should help: https://www.creditbureauhub.org/topic/getting-in-touch-with-live-person-at-the-credit-bureaus-29/?do=findComment&comment=55
  9. I need to speak with someone at the credit bureaus, but the automated phone systems don't appear to allow you to speak with a representative at either Experian or Equifax. I was able to get in touch with a human at TransUnion, but couldn't figure out which number or button to push to talk to a real person at the other two credit reporting agencies. Is there and option for speaking with an operator for them? If not, can someone please tell me which numbers I can use for those companies. Thanks.
  10. Is Credit Repair Legal

    Why Credit Repair Doesn’t Deserve its Bad Rap Bad credit can take hold of anyone’s financial life, whether due to financial missteps of the past or erroneous information reported by creditors. If you’ve had a late payment on a credit card, an account that found its way to a collection agency, or irresponsible use of credit accounts, your credit history shows a less-than-ideal picture of your financial character. Incorrect reporting of your accounts gives off the same negative vibe to entities that have access to your reports. Lenders, employers, and even insurance companies see these black marks on a credit report as a glaring red flag. While a spotted credit report isn’t a life sentence, it can seriously impede your ability to move ahead with what you want in life. A new mortgage, a financed car, or even your dream career can all be put on hold thanks to financial blunders or errors found in your credit history. Although there isn’t a magic button you can push to wipe the slate clean, there are tactics you can implement to get back on the path of financial well-being via your credit history. One of these strategies is professional credit repair. An Industry with a Reputation Credit repair completed by an individual or agency on your behalf is a perfectly legal practice that can yield powerful results for your current and future financial circumstances. Through a credit repair company, errors – inaccurate negative information – are disputed in an effort to have them removed permanently from your credit report. For those who have pesky, incorrect entries on their credit reports that never seem to go away, a credit repair company can be a financial lifesaver. Unfortunately, credit repair as an industry has gained a less-than-perfect reputation among the masses. The negative light shed on credit repair companies can be linked to two unfortunate issues: misunderstanding what credit repair companies are able to provide, and fraudsters representing themselves as credit repair companies just to make a quick buck. To avoid the bad actors in credit repair, it’s important to have realistic expectations of what credit repairs companies can offer. What Credit Repair Is Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act or FCRA, every consumer has a certain set of rights as it relates to their credit report. First, credit reports from the three major credit reporting agencies – Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian – must be made available at no cost no less than once per year. This provision was included in the FCRA to allow individuals the ability to request inaccurate information be removed from reports in a timely fashion. Also within the FCRA, consumers have the right to dispute any entry that is incorrect, incomplete, or untimely, and disputes must be investigated within 30 days for credit agencies to comply with the law. While you can dispute erroneous information found in your credit report on your own, several people opt to have a third party – a credit repair company – take on this challenge for them. It’s your right to request inaccurate data be removed, but it can be time-consuming and even a bit intimidating when you aren’t all that familiar with the FCRA or other pertinent laws. Credit repair companies manage the dispute process for you, after working with you to determine which information is inaccurate and gathering supporting documentation, if needed. A top-notch company also takes steps to scrub your credit report against other applicable laws, including the Fair Credit Billing Act, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, and any others that impact specific groups of consumers. Each of these credit repair tactics are completely legal, and ultimately, they work to your benefit. Credit repair companies do not, however, help you wipe the slate clean when the information dragging down your credit history and score is true and accurate, like a missed payment, a judgment against you, or a bankruptcy. What It Isn’t Thinking credit repair companies are your saving grace when it comes to cleaning up your credit will most likely lead you down a disappointing path. Only incorrect information listed on your credit report, or information that is well past its “expiration date” can be fixed with the help of a credit repair company. Fraudulent credit repair companies may claim to wipe your credit report clean, typically through a process known as segregating your credit file, but this is a farce. Similarly, some less than reputable credit repair companies may promise to fix your credit in a matter of days – this simply isn’t a reality when dealing with the dispute process through the credit reporting agencies. It takes both time and patience to repair your credit the right way. Any credit repair company that asks for a significant fee upfront, before doing any substantive work on your behalf, isn’t likely going to do much if any work for you. Unfortunately, the combination of these fraudulent or misleading aspects of some credit repair companies give the industry an unsavory reputation across the board. However, if you’ve determined that removing negative, inaccurate information from your credit report isn’t a challenge you are willing to go alone, employing the help of a professional, reputable company, or attorney, may be your best next step. Be sure to recognize what responsibilities you have in the process, and commit to working with your credit repair company to achieve optimal results regarding your credit report.
  11. Hi Lady, I am so sorry to hear about your situation. I really hope your dad comes around and makes things right. If it were me I'd definitely set-up a credit fraud alert, consider freezing your credit and request a mailed copy of your credit report from each credit bureau. When you receive them make a note of anything that isn't yours, and start documenting everything. Then (probably before you receive your reports by mail), since you've already been kicked out of your dads house, you might want to bring it up with him again, amicably. Tell him your situation, and let him know you will have to work with the credit bureaus to get things corrected which may require you to report activity that wasn't yours as fraud. Let him know you'd prefer not to do that and give him the opportunity to bring any accounts he opened current, plus hand over anything he's been using under your name. Hotels can be expensive, so I would be sure he understands it's urgent, and wouldn't give him more time than you can afford, because it's probably going to take a couple of months for your credit score to improve if you have to dispute the items with the credit bureaus. Here's a brief overview of fraud alerts, credit freezes and additional considerations. Unfortunately this type of fraud is all too common...
  12. Hi everyone. I need some advice on things. My husband was illegally fired from work back in 2014. We were renting out a town home with my first born son for three and half years. We ended up leaving the place because I did not work and we had no money to pay for the rent anymore. We also ended up losing our brand new car that we financed and ended up moving back to my dads house. It has been a year living with my dad and my husband got his job and has been reinstated back. We now how two more kids and so living at my dads is not working anymore. My husband and I applied for an apartment and has been denied. We've been to four apartments and same thing. I finally got the copy of my credit score in hand and it says I have poor credit. With credit karma it says that I am at 509. I am in shock. I had good credit before despite us having to give back our new car. I seen a copy of my credit report and I see all these credit cards that are open in my name and I do not recall opening these. One day my dad left to go to the store and he left his wallet on the couch. I opened it and seen a gas card in my name and other credit cards. I am hurt and did not know how to feel or think. Because of him my family and I can not get approve for an apartment to live in and When I brought this up to my dad he told us to pack all our things and to get out. My family and I are currently staying in a motel with all our other things in a rented storage. What do I do? My husband told me to report my dad for identity theft but I don't want him to go to jail. I am in big debt because of him. I am stressed because I have to think of my family and their well being. I don't know where to start. If I can get some advice on what I can do to get my credit and my problems fix. I am desperate. How do I dispute all these cards on my name that I did not open? How do I show proof that it wasn't me who opened all these cards? I'm afraid that my dad is doing the same thing to my sisters credit. Please help. I would really appreciate it if I can get some advice on what should I do or how I should do things to get my situation fixed. Thank you in advance.
  13. Hi Angie, I'm sorry to hear about your troubles. That sucks! We've outlined how to get in touch with a human at each credit bureau here: https://www.creditbureauhub.org/topic/getting-in-touch-with-live-person-at-the-credit-bureaus-29/ If you have any trouble let me know.
  14. The IT revolution has yielded smartphones, digital banking and cloud services, forever changing the financial services sector. Now anyone with even a simple smartphone can be connected to a wealth of digital services. But there is one major issue with the IT revolution. It is now easier than ever for criminals to steal personal information and funds, all without ever leaving their homes. The spread of digital financial services has not come without consequences, but there are ways of protecting personal information and personal finances. TransUnion, one of the major credit bureaus, has launched an identity theft protection service named TrueIdentity. Credit bureaus like TransUnion are well equipped to handle identity theft issues. These companies already deal with fraud and falsified information on credit reports. There are also forced to comply with many kinds of regulations. TrueIdentity is a free service provided by TransUnion to help consumers protect vital personal information and keep up to date with the best identity protection methods. TransUnion firsts ask the question “How does identity theft happen?” directly on the front page of the TrueIdentity website. TransUnion believes the first step of protecting against identity theft is understanding how the theft works. The TrueIdentity service has a wealth of facts and information readily available for customers to help them adapt to the changing face of identity theft. The next step of the TrueIdentity service is a three-step process to protect against identity theft . Touch Credit Lock TransUnion offers a 1-touch credit lock tool in case of emergencies. With this tool, customers will be able to disable access to their TransUnion credit report with either the swipe of a finger on a mobile device, or the click of a mouse on a computer. If customers suspect suspicious activity on their credit report, they can easily disable any new inquiries and block any attempt by thieves from apply for new credit lines. If the customer wishes to apply for credit, they can easily turn the TransUnion credit score back on. Instant Alerts By signing up for the TrueIdentity service, customers can receive instant alerts whenever anyone applies for credit in the customer’s name. If the customer is applying for credit themselves, the alert will be expected. But if an identity thief attempts to apply for a loan or credit card using the customer’s name, they’ll be able to see the credit check in real time. TransUnion Reports & Alerts TransUnion also offers a 24/7 service that runs at all times on customer’s credit report. All the customer’s personal details are laid out and the credit report can be refreshed instantly with an unlimited number of refreshes. The TransUnion service running in the background will scan for strange names or addresses on credit reports, which can be the first sign of fraudulent activity. Identity theft is both troublesome and on the rise. Now more than ever are people uploading personal and vital information into computers, cloud services and smartphones, leaving many vulnerable to cyber thieves. But with TrueIdentity by TransUnion, people can start fighting back with knowledge, alerts and protective services to stop identity theft before it happens. TrueIdentity is a completely free service, but offers premium features such as your TransUnion credit score and 3 credit bureau monitoring for $9.95 a month.
  15. Where Can I Get My Credit Report for FREE?

    Hi Shirley, You can get a free copy of your credit report annually from any of the three credit reporting agencies - Experian, Equifax, and the TransUnion once every 12 months
  16. Someone in the accounting department of our family business embezzled nearly $500K forcing us to close. Because that money was stolen we have been forced to shut down our business and are in the process of filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. The Internal Revenue Services said we can call the 3 major credit monitoring companies and speak to someone about our options to correct our credit due to this theft and fraud. I am struggling to speak to a live customer service representative when I call their phone numbers listed on the Experian, Equifax and TransUnion websites. Can someone please tell me how to get a real human on the phone at any or all of the credit bureaus?
  17. Hi Craig, I can totally understand your frustration. The credit bureaus don't make it easy for consumers to get in touch with someone over the telephone. This link should help you get in touch with a human at all 3 credit bureaus. Here's an article with tips for disputing and correcting items on your credit report. In regards to the Better Business Bureau, I don't think they can take adverse action against companies other than working with them to help resolve complaints submitted through the BBB website. Major Credit Bureau BBB Profiles: Here's the BBB pages for each of the credit bureaus in case you're interested seeing what others have complained about, filing your own or writing a review. TransUnion BBB Profile Equifax BBB Profile Experian BBB Profile However, I'd read this article before filing a complaint Best,
  18. I can't believe I actually spoke to a live breathing-human when I called Trans Union today!!!! She sounded Indian and had a strong accent that I could barely understand, but I was still relieved because I couldn't get in touch with anyone at all when I had called Experian and Equifax prior to that. The phone number I used to speak with a human at Transunion is 1-800-916-8800. As I said, I had no such luck with the other two and simply need them to do an Inquiry for a paid off item which they’re not current on and remove that negative item off my report so I can buy a home!! It’s bad when my son and I can’t get a home together because of their negligence!! How come the Better Business Bureau doesn't do anything about it. This is ridiculous!
  19. The growing trend of shopping and banking online or through mobile phones plays a significant role in the increasing number of identity theft victims each year. Combined with the advancing technology used by cyber criminals to steal consumer information, it is no surprise that nearly 17.6 million Americans suffered from identity theft in 2014, the latest year for which data is available from the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Identity theft continues to be a threat to consumers and their financial lives as it can lead to serious issues with an individual credit report that are a challenge to correct. For that reason, it is important to know the rights and protections you have under federal law as it relates to stolen information. The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act, also known as FACTA, is an amendment to the Fair Credit and Reporting Act, or FCRA, designed to safeguard individuals from the threat of identity theft. Added in 2003, FACTA provides a number of protections to consumers relating to their specific credit information and how it is used. Here are the main provisions within FACTA aimed to reduce the ramifications of identity theft among consumers. Fraud Alerts In an effort to provide protection to consumers who have already experienced identity theft, FACTA imposes fraud alert guidelines for the credit reporting agencies. Under the law, consumers have the right to place an alert on their credit report that establishes an added level of security when seeking new credit. The fraud alert prompts potential new creditors to contact you directly in response to a credit application, and it remains on your credit report for 90 days. Only one credit reporting agency needs to be notified of a fraud alert requestion; the agency is required to report the alert to the remaining two agencies. Access to Credit Reports A measure to prevent the damaging effects of identity theft is also included in FACTA. This provision allows every consumer the opportunity to receive a copy of their credit report once per year at no cost. Each of three major credit bureaus – Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion – must make your credit report available once each year upon your request, or you may request your annual credit report here. The ability to review your credit report in full is an important aspect of staying ahead of identity theft concerns. Your credit report includes information on all credit accounts, current and previous, as well as inquiries made relating to new credit accounts. Should you see information that was not initiated by you or one of your creditors, you can dispute the data through each credit reporting agency in an attempt to correct the issue. Blocking Information In addition to providing access to credit reports and fraud alert systems, FACTA also gives consumers the power to request the removal of information related to identity theft. When adequate proof is provided, the credit reporting agencies have the power to prevent any data relating to identity theft from appearing on your credit report. This safeguards your credit report and score for new creditors down the line. FACTA was and remains an important addition to the FCRA. Identity theft has the potential to severely damage your credit report, score, and overall financial reputation, but the provisions and guidelines built into FACTA work to prevent these detrimental consequences. If you’ve been the victim of identity theft or want to stay ahead of cyber criminals, know your rights under federal law and take the recommended action to protect your information.
  20. Unable to request credit reports online

    Hi Dubhlaine, I’m sorry to hear about the trouble your son is having. I’d have him fill out this form and mail it in. That is what I do whenever I have trouble requesting my reports online. In regards to his denial of credit, it will depend on which credit card he is applying for and what his credit reports look like when he receives them. Unfortunately, most cellular and utility bills don’t report payments to the credit bureaus unless someone stops making payments and the account goes to collections. I’d wait until you receive copies of each of his credit reports to make sure there is no inaccurate information in there then apply for a credit card that is easier to get for individuals with little to no credit history, such as the Capital One Platinum credit card. However, he may need to first start building his credit with a secured credit card which he shouldn’t have any trouble getting approved for. Retail cards are also easier to obtain than normal unsecured credit cards and help with credit building.
  21. My son is 24 years old and has never checked his credit reports previously but when he recently tried to check (after having his Passport and SS card stolen in Oct 2016) none of the agencies appeared to be able to validate his identity as one of the questions is about a mortgage and retail card he has never had! Although he checks 'none of the above' all three claim his reports are unavailable online! He recently applied for a credit card and was denied because "not enough accounts opened long enough to establish a credit history'. He has a full-time salaried position, he has his own cell phone account and had some utilities in his name for a couple years while in college. He pays his cell phone bill on time every month and was never late with utility payments. I have given him the phone numbers of the agencies I found on here, but other than that, is there something more that you suggest he do? Thank you for the support! John
  22. Hi Cindy, These numbers should help you get in touch with a live person at each of the credit bureaus to resolve most issues. Equifax - 866 349-5191 - Live Agent (Press 5) TransUnion - 800-916-8800 - Live Agent (Press 4) Experian - 800-509-8495 - Live Agent (Press 0) Please let us know how it goes. Thanks.
  23. The Credit Bureaus seemed to have “meshed” some of my accounts and won't supply the information I need to underwriting. I am trying to refinance my home, and absolutely can't reach a live human at any of the credit bureaus to “unmesh” this ridiculous mess.
  24. In 1970, the law governing the activities of the three major credit reporting agencies, known as the Fair Credit Reporting Act or FCRA, was passed in an effort to provide a specific set of rights for consumers. The FCRA is focused on safeguarding the information gathered, maintained, and shared by the credit reporting agencies, namely Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian, but extends its reach to cover similar information used within other systems, such as employers, housing, and banking. Within the FCRA, specific guidelines are shared which spell out how information can be used for or against consumers, making it important to understand your rights under the law. Here’s what the FCRA provides to you as a consumer. Access to Your Credit Report The most prominent right you have as a consumer protected under the FCRA is your ability to access your credit report easily. Guidelines in the FCRA state that the credit reporting agencies must provide your credit file upon your request no less than once per year. This site allows you to access your credit report at no cost each year, but it is your responsibility to request it. Limited Access from Outside Parties Protections against unnecessary access to your credit are built into the FCRA, specifically limiting the availability of your personal credit history and information to those who have a valid, verifiable need to access it. A number of organizations may request information on your credit history, including banks or credit unions, insurance companies, property managers or landlords, or insurance companies, for the purpose of verifying your past financial activities. While these entities are often provided access to your credit information upon request, you have the right to know who, when, and for what purpose the information was accessed. Accuracy in Reporting A significant component of the FCRA is the requirement of the credit reporting agencies to analyze disputes of inaccurate information from consumers. If erroneous information has been discovered within your credit file, a credit reporting agency is mandated to examine the details of that entry within 30 days. When the data cannot be verified as correct or incorrect, it is the agency’s responsibility to remove it. If a disputed entry cannot be removed, you have the right to add a note to your file explaining your position. Removing Negative Information Negative information listed within your credit file can linger for a substantial period of time, making it difficult to move ahead in your financial life. Under the FCRA, you have the right to request negative information be removed from your credit report after seven years. It is important to note that major negative entries, like bankruptcy, may remain on your report for up to 10 years. Protection against Disclosing Personal Account Information Quite a bit of information is included in your credit report that extends well beyond current account information. Previous addresses, past employers, your date of birth, social security number and account numbers are all provided within a personal credit file. The FCRA protects this sensitive information from being shared in an unsafe manner. For instance, businesses are required to list only a portion of your credit card or bank account information on a printed receipt, and your full social security number is no longer included on your credit report. These safeguards help protect you against identity theft. Denial Information The FCRA also requires that you are made aware whenever your credit is used against you. For instance, if an application for a new credit card or loan is denied, you have the right to know the reason for the denial. Businesses that use your credit report to make a decision about offering new credit are required to provide you information about denials in writing, at your request. Seeking Damages Individuals also have the ability to seek compensation for damages under the FCRA. Credit reporting agencies, creditors, and any other organization that regularly uses credit reports may be liable if they misuse or otherwise violate the act. Your credit report is one of your most powerful assets. Strong credit paves the way for new credit accounts with affordable interest rates, not to mention provides a snapshot of your financial reputation. The FCRA was signed into law in an effort safeguard that assets by setting specific regulations against the unlawful use of your credit information. It’s important to understand the rights laid out in the FCRA and how you are protected as a consumer using credit.
  25. Get in Touch With Human at Equifax

    Hi Dave, Sounds like you need to get a copy of Equifax credit report, but it might not be a bad idea to review all of them. You can order all 3 easily through http://www.annualcreditreport.com. Took me about a week to receive them all in the mail the last time I did. Otherwise, if you're ready to talk to someone at Equifax or want to request just your Equifax credit report you can use the following options: By Phone: 866-349-5191 - say 'credit' or press '1'; then say 'denial' or press '2' (because you were denied credit.) To speak with a live agent say 'agent' or press '5' rather than saying 'credit' or pressing '1' from the first menu's options. Online: http://www.equifax.com/fcra By Mail: Annual Credit Report Request Service P.O. Box 105281 Atlanta, GA 30348-5281 Be sure to include the form and other information on found here.
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